Pakistan Falling To The Taliban?

It looks that way, and it also looks like the Pakistani army can’t do a whole lot about it.

After negotiating a deal with the Taliban where Pakistan handed over an area know as the Swat Valley, the Taliban has decided that they want more-and are actively taking it. Did the Taliban “just decide” to expand their influence, or was this their plan all along? I think so too. That Swat deal is the same kind of negotiation Barack Obama is thinking about in Afghanistan.

Why should we care about Pakistan you ask? They have nukes. It wasn’t that long ago when Pakistan and India nearly came to nuclear blows over the disputed pile of dirt known as Kasmir. Imagine if the Taliban got of hold of those nukes that are obviously ready to launch. Iran would love it.

But Barack Obama wants to negotiate. They don’t. Who was that analyst on Fox, I think his name was Mansoor, who said “smash mouth diplomacy is the only thing these people understand.” Capitulation is a sign of weakness to them, and the Taliban are proving that theory now.

If the Taliban does end up taking power in Pakistan, we know what we have to do. But what will Obama do? What do you think this Jesus hating, Sharia law loving imposter will do?

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2 Responses to Pakistan Falling To The Taliban?

  1. raveem says:

    i don’t agree with this the report is not based on any true intelligence reporting this article has largely based on pure speculation try interlink to 2 piece of news to make the 1+1=3 i am not a expert but aware enough to understand international relation as i from pakistan Lahore studying accountancy but religiously flow the international news and study AF-PAK-IND history ,but i would like to make some point u cant win this (war) this is war for U but invasion for people living in AFG even in Pakistan
    what people believe is that , The West has given many descriptions to its battles (they don’t like our freedoms, WMD, regime change, need for democracy etc.) and the people of the region have tried to expose them as having a hidden agenda (security of Israel, control of oil, crusade, muslim bashing etc.)

    BUT you need understand is that In Afghanistan the Taliban are resisting US and NATO presence. As there is no unified or disciplined command they are typically acting like uncontrolled guerrilla groups where a leader has a random group of raiders and their own laws. War lords are also calling themselves Taliban and so are the drug lords because such an identification makes things easier for their nefarious activities. In Pakistan there is a class struggle also going on in Swat. There is no single definition which can be applied as lawless groups tend to morph and for lack of labels they get a singular label. Like Al-Qaeda.
    There of course can never be a justification for the atrocities being committed either by Taliban or their name sake pseudo Taliban, nor for the regressive actions in the form of school destructions and total lack of women’s rights. Many groups have emerged including a struggle against the landed class, and when we try and treat many multifarious phenomenae with a singular prescription there cannot be any success.

    There also cannot be Pakistan specific solutions only because the wind of people blows from both sides and you cannot have coolants being sprayed in Pakistan while the fire is being stoked in Afghanistan. We believe that a deep and long term solution is required outside our borders:
    1. The US must find a way to disentangle from Iraq during the next year.

    2. Afghanistan requires a Jirga to bring all comabatants together and a gradual US, NATO/ISAF withdrawal under a multiparty agreement guaranteed by other sovereign players who are direct neighbors (Pakistan, Iran, China), Russia and the United States. A rebuilding plan with adequate funds should be a sweetener and would be much less expensive that the current US policy.

    3. The IPI pipeline which is important for the region to get energy from Iran to India and Pakistan has been under US pressure not to be built in an effort to keep Iran isolated. This has to be relaxed.

    4. US interference in Iranian Balochistan (Sistan province) which has been acknowledged by President Bush in his Presidential find report to Congress in 2008, has to cease because while it destabilizes Tehran by funding the Sunni Baloch to rise against Shia Tehran, it also filters into Pakistan. This has got to stop but the Pakistan government and its people must look at the fairness of our relationship with our Baloch brothers and redress the grievances of the last fifty years.

    Within Pakistan the matter is very complicated. There are more than 30 groups/leaders with different loyalties, besides the issues of lack of education, infra-structure and the lot. The stick has not worked in isolation anywhere in the world, therefore more carrot and less stick has to be used with the input of elected people of the area. The fear of the secular people among us, of Talibanisation in Pakistan is leading to a knee jerk reaction which will not help (for example the MQM’s propagation of the same idea in Karachi and resulting Pathan/Mohajir strife). However a balanced approach without external pressures has a chance of succeeding because human misery requires a common cure and the left, right or center do not matter. If policies are regressive or if secular ideas deny local sensitivities and misgivings both shall fail. A gradual change with education ensured and peace in the air has the greatest chance of success.
    Raveem Zafar Choudhry
    Pakistan, Lahore

  2. rjjrdq says:

    I’m sorry Raveem, I’m having a hard time understanding what you’re saying. I think you’re saying “get out and give us money”. Legitimize the Taliban? Not. Also, those splinter groups calling themselves Taliban seemed pretty organized in Afghanistan pre-2001. You go ahead and negotiate though. Let me know how it goes.

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